You don’t have to be a Techie to use EdTech

August 11, 2014 — 1 Comment

According to this article, using iPads in schools is still a challenge. There are a variety of reasons for that, but one which really stood out to us was the fact that teachers who weren’t used to new technology felt like they would never be able to implement it in the classrooms.

It’s quite the ironic twist – one of the main purposes of new technology is to make life easier for everyone, not give even more privilege to a select audience.

And technologies do make life easier – according to this infographic on the flipped classroom model, enhancing lessons with the use of various multimedia tools has helped students and teachers tremendously. And, something which is relevant for this post, it reports that nearly a half of the teachers using the tool have had more than 16 years of experience in classrooms.

On the whole, the article presents a very positive vision of technologies in the classroom – as a supplement, they can add a lot of value to students’ experience. But how can we empower teachers to use them more?

The first article we link already has a suggestion – meetings where teachers from all levels of expertise talk about their experience and bring new questions to the table. Indeed, we should aim to make technologies accessible and usable by the majority, not just the IT specialists.

To build up on that, though, we propose that you also bring your students’ voices to the table – see how they work best, how they learn best, and try to identify the thing that engages them the most.

After all, it’s not about having the latest fancy innovation in your classroom, or the shiniest new app. It’s about finding the thing that works for everyone and building up on it systematically until you find a successful, flexible process.

One response to You don’t have to be a Techie to use EdTech

  1. 

    How companies can nurture innovation and motivate their talents to bring innovations forward?

    Each company is destined to get the results it gets. What I mean by this is that poor organization, lack of solid and sustainable innovation culture lead to poor results, and more than before, to a company’s trouble or death.
    Smart business leaders shape the culture of their company to drive innovation. Success and constant positive results come from the implementation and execution of strategies, business models, structure, processes, technologies and incentive systems that encourage innovation.
    If you would like to read more about learning innovation, you can access to my blog on: http://worldofinnovations.net/2014/08/11/7-ways-to-create-a-culture-of-innovation/

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